Inflammatory foods and dementia

Inflammatory foods and dementia

American researchers at Columbia University believe they have discovered a key part in understanding the link between diet and dementia. A specific dietary model was attached to the markers of blood inflammation. Moreover, in elderly adults who followed such a dietary pattern, the volume of cerebral gray matter was lower and had worst visuospasic cognitive functions. People who consume less omega 3, less calcium, vitamin E, vitamin D and vitamin B5 and B2 have more inflammatory biomarkers. The study suggests that dietary factors such as fish, nuts, polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3, folate and Mediterranean diets are associated with lower risks for Alzheimer’s (AD) disease and better brain health in older people. Other evidence shows that many foods and nutrients modulate inflammatory processes. This study showed an association between increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL6) and worse brain cognitions and volumes. In the study of 330 elderly adults in the Washington Heights-Inwood Community Aging project, researchers conducted structural scans with MRI and measured the levels of inflammatory biomarkers, both CRP and IL6. Study participants completed a 61-point food frequency questionnaire that asked for nutrient intake over the last year. From this information, researchers used a statistical model to create the nutrition-related inflammation pattern (INP). “INP is basically a linear combination of 24 nutrients, each with a different weight on INP.” Participants in the study were also subjected to neuropsychological tests that evaluated memory, language, execution speed, and visuospatial function. From these test scores, the researchers calculated a mean composite cognitive score for each participant. Those with less years of education have had a relatively high INP. Researchers have determined that having a smaller gray matter cerebral volume could help explain why those who use more inflammatory substances have worse visuospacial cognitions. These new findings suggest that interventions that reduce inflammatory markers may be helpful. Once this is known, it may be possible to intervene, not only through a healthier diet, but perhaps also with a micronutrient...

Read More

Gut microbiota-bone axis

Gut microbiota-bone axis

Have already for some years now that we talk and we study the immense world of the microbiota, an important regulator of homeostasis of the body, including intestinal and extra-intestinal effects, even you compare it to an immense body of him with all his independent features; it is also considered a “second brain”, but the most interesting discovery in recent months, carried out by the University of Toronto, Canada, is its close relationship with the skeletal system. For several years he was associated with the beneficial relationship between the osteoporotic disease and microbiota, but this study focuses on the effect of the influence of the intestinal microbial communities and molecules that synthesize and regulate bone health. While research in this area is limited, the results of preclinical studies claim that the intestinal microbiota has a positive impact on the parameters of bone mineral density and strength. Moreover, the administration of probiotics in preclinical models have demonstrated greater bone mineralization and increased bone strength in treated patients. The kind of preferential bacteria that has shown these beneficial effects on bone is Lactobacillus and then lactobacilli are among the best candidates for future clinical intervention studies. However, their effectiveness depends on the stage of growth, in fact, usually it is the first few years of life that are an important opportunity to determine bone health, especially through the modulation of the microbiota. Also, the difference of sex specific influences the efficacy of probiotics. Although auspicious, many questions about the microbiota-axis bones require consideration of potential mechanisms; specific effectiveness in relation to sex; the effective dose of probiotics; and the timing and the duration of treatment. But we can definitely say that this study opens up another interesting port on the universe of the intestinal...

Read More

The Mediterranean Diet and ADHD in Children and Adolescents

The Mediterranean Diet and ADHD in Children and Adolescents

An interesting study conducted by the University of Barcelona and published in Pediatrics. January 2017 showed a higher risk for the disorder attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among children and adolescents who are less adherent to the Mediterranean diet than most members. They are always carried out studies on the relationship between low quality of food and the higher risk of ADHD, but had never been performed studies regarding the Mediterranean diet and ADHD. The association between a low adherence to the Mediterranean diet and the likelihood of a diagnosis of ADHD remained significant even after adjustment for confounding variables such as body mass index, physical activity level, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and social conditions. The study included 60 children and adolescents who had recently been diagnosed with ADHD and 60 participants by sex and the same control (age for all participants, from 6 to 16 years). The two groups were compared with respect to dietary intake and adherence to a Mediterranean diet. In all children control tests and adolescents with ADHD they have shown statistically significant data to lower scores of adherence to a Mediterranean diet compared to controls. For example, compared to the control group, those who had been recently diagnosed with ADHD had significantly lower probability of consumption for a second portion of fruit every day. They also consumed less fresh vegetables or cooked one or more times every day or pasta or rice almost every day. In addition, the percentage of subjects with ADHD eat more often in a fast-food. In addition, a significantly greater percentage of patients with ADHD jumped the breakfast compared with control participants. Both groups consumed fish, dairy products, baked goods or with relatively equal frequency. Similarly, patients with ADHD have consumed about twice the sugar and candy, in 4.7 g / day, compared to non-ADHD participants, at 2.4 g / day. Patients with ADHD also consumed more soft drinks (41.1 vs 22 g / day) and cola-based drinks (17.2 g / day vs 9.2 g / day). We must also consider the inverse relationship of the study, ie the possibility that individuals with ADHD can make food choices (foods high in fat or sugar) to balance their traits of impulsivity or emotional stress. This observation seems to be confirmed, as the participants with ADHD who consumed sugary foods and drinks significantly more than the control persons. This involves a diet with poor quality that may lead to deficiencies of essential nutrients, such as iron, zinc, magnesium, and omega-3 fatty acids, which contribute to the cognitive growth and healthy physical. These nutrients appear to play an essential role in the etiology of ADHD and it is believed that this could...

Read More

The Mediterranean diet increases brain volume in the elderly.

The Mediterranean diet increases brain volume in the elderly.

More and more research suggests that adherence to a diet that matches the criteria of a style of Mediterranean food life (MEDI) may be protective for the protection from the aging brain. In a study conducted at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK, in a cohort of more than 400 people from Scotland, who were about 70 years of age, those who were low consumers of the Medi, had significantly lower total brain volume than those who regularly had adhered to this type of diet. Interestingly, an increase in the consumption of fish or less of red meat consumption did not alter this result: this suggests that other components of the Medi or possibly all of its components together, are responsible for the association. Medi invites to a consumption of fruits, vegetables, cereals, legumes and olive oil in large quantities, to moderate fish consumption, and a low intake of red meat. Many studies in the past have told us long ago the validity of the Mediterranean diet, especially for better cognitive function and reduced risk of stroke and dementia. It also has recently been associated with increased cortical thickness and a greater brain volume in older patients. This study differs from others because in this last have examined brain measurements in an extended period of time. In fact qualitative measurements across test and measurement with MRI were performed in a 6 year period, evaluating the adherence of the participants to the Mediterranean diet. Moreover, in none of the participants were diagnosed signs of Alzheimer’s disease. This study dimosta the validity of this type of power and how it is desirable to healthy food corresponds a proper...

Read More

OIL and HEALTH

OIL and HEALTH

It is essential to use only first cold pressed oil, decanted and filtered by physical processes and non-chemical and contained in glass bottles, dark if possible. It is also important that the temperature at the time of pressing does not exceed 30°. Only with this type of extraction the “purity” of the oil guaranteed and the presence of more or less variable amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids, also referred to as “vitamin F”. It is also important that these oils are derived from seeds, stored in dark glass bottles and refrigerated after opening. It is imperative at this point to make a digression on vegetable fats and the method used for oils extraction to understand why it is essential to use only oil from the first pressing. In recent decades, to increase the yield, “hot” oils have started to be extracted (using water vapor at 160-200°) With this method, the oils are colored and have an unpleasant odor and therefore there is need for further refining intervention and deodorization. In addition, often, there is another cold pressing, also using solvents (chrome), to obtain a maximum productivity. With this process the oils have more ingestible substances (waxes for example) for which further refining is needed – and there is no assurance of the absence of solvent in the finished product. Additionally heating the oil destroys vitamin E, a vitamin that is naturally present in oils with a first cold pressing; a vitamin that is essential for its antioxidant action against polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are therefore more susceptible to peroxidation reactions. To overcome when has been stated above, the oils then must undergo other processes: addition of synthetic vitamin E and a hydrogenation process. With the latter process, there is the transformation of a portion of molecules from the cis-cis form into the cis-trans form (as already seen for the preparation of margarine), a form more stable but biologically inactive. At the end of all these processes the oil turns out to be “dead” biologically. On the contrary the first cold pressed oil is “alive” biologically, rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, or vitamin F. Additionally to avoid easy oxidation reactions, facilitated by light, and thus resulting in the ranciding of the oil itself, it is useful to keep the oil in “dark” containers and once opened they should be stored preferably in the refrigerator. Olive Oil is more stable at high temperatures and therefore can be used for cooking, frying as well as raw, while seed oils can only be used raw or in addition to baked goods such as bread and cakes. Proper nutrition should provide an equal amount of saturated fat, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated. However, olive oil is...

Read More